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What’s your most prized possession?

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Ginger Williams
Ginger Williams
10 days ago

My passwords, iPhone, iPad, laptop. Two-factor authentication means those are the keys to my digitized family photos, my bank account, my insurance account, my retirement account, and my ebook and streaming accounts. I can replace most things, but I need passwords and at least one device for daily functioning.

Philip Stein
Philip Stein
11 days ago

My most prized possession is my retirement nest egg which, I hope, will provide a financially secure retirement for my wife and me.

Having funds available for discretionary spending gives us the opportunity to do some traveling and allows us to purchase a few nice-to-haves.

Last edited 11 days ago by Philip Stein
Mike Drak
Mike Drak
15 days ago

My Salmon fly fishing rod. I look forward to using it every chance I get!

Bob Wilmes
Bob Wilmes
15 days ago

My most prized possession is my universal communications device also known as my iPhone. Not only can I bring virtually all of the world’s knowledge to my fingertips at anytime, I can talk with loved ones using facetime, share and store thousands of amazing videos and photographs, respond to friends and colleagues using email, find my location using GPS and use maps to get me where I’m going and use on of the hundreds of apps for useful helping me navigate my life. I just imagine what 15th century mariners could have done had they had iPhones. iPhones have had a truly revolutionary impact on humans globally.

Jim Wasserman
Jim Wasserman
17 days ago

My memories of great times with my family. Moving back and forth between Europe and the US, we don’t tend to save stuff. To the extent I do have stuff, they are small tokens that are memory cues for the great times, such as a flattened penny my sons and I created on railroad tracks, or a small elephant figure on a bookshelf to remind me of Thailand adventure. When we did first sell all oyur stuff to move, the things that were hardest to part with were all my books. Each one was not only a story or information in and of itself, but I was reminded by them of where and when I was when I read/used it. Many were given to me by my students, so I photographed the title or personal note page in each to hold on to those memories.

John Goodell
John Goodell
17 days ago

I don’t have lots of possessions because I find possessions end up possessing me. Whatever possessions I own have utility, and I spend a lot of money on those things to maximize their utility and effectiveness. The best two examples I have are: 1) my Tesla Model 3 with autopilot that make sitting in traffic less miserable (see previous HumbleDollar article); & 2) my clothing. If you dress nicely, people treat you better. I don’t spend a lot of money on my clothes, but I buy a few nice things and have everything (expensive or not) tailored to fit me. There are few uses of money more under-appreciated than money spent at a good tailor. As an attorney, I’ve found that clients actually listen better when I look better, which makes my advice ultimately more effective.

Last edited 16 days ago by John Goodell

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