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Should you prepay a mortgage?

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Jackie
Jackie
1 day ago

For those on the cusp of retirement, it seems like a good idea if you have plenty of near-cash reserves to tide you over in event of a market crash. The stock market is sky high. It might be good to harvest some of the gains and decrease required monthly cash outlay.

I am about to retire with decent savings, but without a meaningful pension. I am only 60, and don’t plan to collect SS until 70. As I get ready to switch from saving to spending, the importance of income and cashflow is coming into sharp focus.

I haven’t paid the mortgage off yet because I am unsure of which type of account to take it from – retirement or non-retirement, if retirement Roth or 401K? I am trying to catch up on my financial literacy and figure it out before the market crashes.

Thanks Jonathan for this site – its an awesome resource!

Kurt S
Kurt S
2 months ago

I paid cash for a house 24 years ago. I have HELOC now, which allows me to use up to 80% of the equity. I’ve only done that twice in the past few years. The last time was in April 2020. Put the entire amount into 4 stocks. 3x my money. Then pay back the HELOC loan. The risk/reward when I saw the prices of a few stocks I liked seemed very good.

Rodger Frego
Rodger Frego
2 months ago

Often times it comes down to the interest rate. I paid cash for my first home when interest rates were moderate to high. I sold that house this past March and bought another house. I could have paid it off, still can anytime I want, but at a 2.35% mortgage rate via a VA loan that doesn’t make sense to me. The General consensus is that interest rates will soon go up across the board along with inflation but that 2.35% interest rate is fixed and can never change. If my rate was 4-5% I would think much differently, but at 2.35% it is a no brainer whether I itemize or not. So the one answer solution doesn’t apply. It all depends.

Richard Gore
Richard Gore
4 months ago

I have found that being debt free provides me with a wonderful sense of well-being. I wouldn’t trade it for a larger portfolio.

Gene Simmons
Gene Simmons
5 months ago

Paying off a mortgage creates another floor under your personal net worth and creates cash flow that can then be invested in other areas that might add risk. The way I see it, buying stocks without paying off a mortgage is no different than investing on margin.

Another consideration is taxes. If you are not itemizing, then paying off a mortgage is like a tax free bond return, while other investments often add to taxable income. In other words, a 3% mortgage is closer to 4% after taxes. That’s a pretty good return in this environment.

Finally, it helps me sleep at night. That’s the best return on investment.

Rodger Frego
Rodger Frego
2 months ago
Reply to  Gene Simmons

The difference is that a margin loan is variable and you can get a fixed mortgage in the 2% range. Margin rates could easily go up to 10% + in the near future as inflation skyrockets and interest rates do the same. So I hear you. At todays fixed interest rates it will likely almost be considered a free loan in the next 5 years or so. Those who have variable home loans are the ones who should jump ship while they can.

nick ronalds
nick ronalds
4 months ago
Reply to  Gene Simmons

I’ve been thinking about that too, and agree that paying mortgage rates is like paying a bond. Then realized that if I take money out of my IRA I’d pay taxes on the distribution, and possibly push myself into a higher tax bracket. So the reasoning above works–but only if you have a taxable account without too much in capital gains.

David Powell
David Powell
5 months ago

Maybe. If you’re working, love where you live, saved at least six months of take-home pay for unexpected needs, and have retirement savings on track, then yes, pay down your mortgage faster. I’d do it again, even if bond yields were higher, for the greater happiness and better cash flow.

nick ronalds
nick ronalds
4 months ago
Reply to  David Powell

“Greater happiness” doesn’t strike me as a reason that can be generalized. Whether you want more or less leverage is a function of your tolerance for risk.

rayanmiller6303
rayanmiller6303
2 months ago
Reply to  nick ronalds

Not all of us are wired the same, if you sleep better at night or have less stress with a paid off home, that seems like a greater happiness to that person or people.

David Powell
David Powell
2 months ago
Reply to  nick ronalds

My happiness here has more to do with satisfaction from reaching a long-term goal and the freedom of outright ownership, than it does any connection to risk in the assets we own.

nick ronalds
nick ronalds
4 months ago

Yes, if you have bonds in your portfolio yielding less than the after-tax cost of your mortgage, it makes sense to pay off your mortgage first. But if you want leverage to increase your exposure to equities, a mortgage is the cheapest way to borrow for retail folks, i.e., those of us who aren’t corporations and able to issue bonds.

Kurt S
Kurt S
2 months ago
Outside of owning a house. 95% stocks, 5% cash . Never any bonds. Worked fine for me for the past 30 years. 

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