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Is it okay not to leave a tip at a full-service restaurant?

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mdh2959
mdh2959
4 months ago

Have you ever been a server in a restaurant?

mdh2959
mdh2959
4 months ago

No. Tipping more as the pandemic subsides. Seeing more “service charges” added – 18-20% to ensure fair wages, so that eliminates tipping at those restaurants.

Thomas
Thomas
5 months ago

Maybe if your waiter is actively hostile or rude, but otherwise no. If you’re too cheap to tip, you probably shouldn’t eat in a restaurant. That’s my approach. 😁

Last edited 5 months ago by Thomas
Pete Storm
Pete Storm
5 months ago

I used to start my tipping at 15% and adjust from there. Due to the pandemic, I now start at 25%. I adjust from there based on quality of service, but I consider 10% stiffing someone.

R Quinn
R Quinn
5 months ago

No! Unless the server is especially rude and incompetent (very rare), I leave at least 20%. I don’t hold the server responsible for actions by the kitchen or others. That server has a tough job and without doubt they need the money more than I do. I even tip in Europe. It’s a habit I can’t break.

Catherine
Catherine
5 months ago

I almost always tip, even at part-service restaurants and nowadays, even with takeaway, since the restaurants in our city are closed to table service. I have known people who are raising their families as wait staff and glad I am not in their shoes.

John M
John M
5 months ago

Not in the US; exceptions should be rare. I leave a tip even for poor service, it’s just not as much as for good service.

There was only one time where I left essentially no tip. The situation went beyond terrible service, and I’ll just leave it at that.

Ginger Williams
Ginger Williams
2 months ago
Reply to  John M

The one time I had a truly terrible experience, I asked to speak with manager, told him why I was unhappy, and handed him my bill, payment, and 10% tip. Perhaps alerting him to situation encouraged him to spend a bit more time on the floor, where he could see the safety violations, poor service, and food being sent back to kitchen.

Jim Wasserman
Jim Wasserman
5 months ago

It really depends on the system. Living in Europe, where waitstaff are paid a living wage (mostly), I just rounded to leave the change. In the US, tips are considered a part of the compensation (and this really needs to change), and so I always try to leave a tip of some sort. Remember also that in many places tips are pooled among staff, so non-tipping hurts many.

Rick Connor
Rick Connor
5 months ago

I was a busboy at 12, and remember those @#@##$ who didn’t tip. I’ve never wanted to be one of them. I tend to leave a nominal tip for nominal service, and overtip for exceptional service. It would have to be an extremely bad situation for me not to leave a tip. The references to Europe are interesting. I’ve traveled a bit and find it hard to change lifelong habits.

Burney
Burney
5 months ago

I worry that this question has not even one qualifier. So, no. If you are not a psychopath, then of course you leave a tip. During the pandemic, if you can find an indoor restaurant, tip like you mean it. If you are in Europe for a trip, no, you can just leave your change. But, if you live there and hate their horrible service, be friendly and leave a decent tip. Maybe they will pay attention to you next time.

John Goodell
John Goodell
5 months ago

I waited tables in college while I was in ROTC. I’d go home at 1am exhausted after closing, wake up at 6 to do an Army workout, then to class and back to the restaurant. I still remembering the feeling of getting stiffed, and it hurt. Tip your waiters even when they’re bad. There’s often a person who is struggling on the other end, and they are serving you. Some people love waiting tables, but many do it because they have to (and the pandemic has only highlighted how vulnerable that segment of our society is).

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