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What are your favorite financial apps and websites, present company excepted?

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Mark Hirsch
Mark Hirsch
1 month ago

I’ve been using Quicken since sometime in the early 90s; unless it was a bit sooner. Best all around for tracking spending and logging my portfolio transactions. As someone else mentioned it can be frustrating, but I haven’t found anything comparable.
Morningstar is a good basic research tool. Many others, but these are my two main go-to’s.

Nick Politakis
Nick Politakis
1 month ago

I have used Quicken Premier for many many years now. I have to admit that I am frustrated with it at times but I think it’s the best financial software program ever.

Sonja Haggert
Sonja Haggert
3 months ago

My favorite financial websites are dripinvesting.org, finviz.com, simplysafedividends.com, theoxfordclub.com, wealthyretirement.com.
My favorite apps are betterment.com and nerdwallet.com

Rick Connor
Rick Connor
5 months ago

I’ve started using PayPal and Venmo for occasional payments to family, friends, and a few contractors. We’ve been doing online banking and bill paying for a while, but are looking at automating some of our bills as we anticipate more travel in retirement (and post-Covid). I still depend heavily in Excel, and self-aggregate my accounts for yearly balance sheets.

parkslope
parkslope
1 month ago
Reply to  Rick Connor

I prefer Zelle because it uses bank to bank transactions and is embedded in my bank’s app. However, I recently started using Venmo after finding out that it can be linked with my Amex card without a fee which means that I don’t have to give Venmo my bank account info.

OUTinMinnesota
OUTinMinnesota
5 months ago

When young, my dad’s example was what I followed… use a spreadsheet to track spending and to plan for upcoming bills.

When I started investing, I got damned frustrated because that spreadsheet couldn’t update itself as market values updated. That frustration led me to the Quicken app.

I’m still using it for three basic functions:

  • Cashflow management
  • Budget management
  • Investment management
Mike Zaccardi
Mike Zaccardi
5 months ago

I use good ole excel for most personal finance tracking. Boring, I concede.

There are some cool sites though – obliviousinvestor has a great Social Security calculator, BofA/Merrill has awesome free research & charts, Fidelity Investments has a simple Solo 401k calculator, The Points Guy is ideal for credit card rewards, The Finance Buff has excellent takes on tax & retirement account issues.

I’m not big on the finance app scene – many times those can be information overload! Keeping it simple has its virtues.

Adam Grossman
Adam Grossman
6 months ago

Tiller Money is a relatively new tool for tracking expenses. It downloads data into a Google Sheet. It’s not nearly as polished as something like Mint, but in exchange for the rough edges, it’s very flexible.

James McGlynn CFA RICP®
James McGlynn CFA RICP®
6 months ago

I use “Personal Capital” as my financial aggregator. It keeps track of my expenses, investment accounts and mortgage. It also has a very good retirement feature projecting my pensions, annuities, medical expenses projected investment returns. The service is free-although I’m sure they prefer you to use their investment products.

kristinehayes2014
kristinehayes2014
6 months ago

I have been using “Mint” for about two years now. It’s a simple way to keep track of my various accounts and their balances.

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