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What are your favorite financial apps and websites, present company excepted?

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peterfell66
peterfell66
2 months ago

Am using Pralana Gold for retirement planning – very detailed Excel model and very flexible and I can follow the numbers better than in the web based apps (might be personal preference). For websites it’s Bogleheads.org and Morningstar.com

Mark Hirsch
Mark Hirsch
8 months ago

I’ve been using Quicken since sometime in the early 90s; unless it was a bit sooner. Best all around for tracking spending and logging my portfolio transactions. As someone else mentioned it can be frustrating, but I haven’t found anything comparable.
Morningstar is a good basic research tool. Many others, but these are my two main go-to’s.

Nick Politakis
Nick Politakis
8 months ago

I have used Quicken Premier for many many years now. I have to admit that I am frustrated with it at times but I think it’s the best financial software program ever.

Sonja Haggert
Sonja Haggert
10 months ago

My favorite financial websites are dripinvesting.org, finviz.com, simplysafedividends.com, theoxfordclub.com, wealthyretirement.com.
My favorite apps are betterment.com and nerdwallet.com

Will
Will
3 months ago
Reply to  Sonja Haggert

 finviz.com was amazing! fun! about 1 lifetime of learning there

Rick Connor
Rick Connor
1 year ago

I’ve started using PayPal and Venmo for occasional payments to family, friends, and a few contractors. We’ve been doing online banking and bill paying for a while, but are looking at automating some of our bills as we anticipate more travel in retirement (and post-Covid). I still depend heavily in Excel, and self-aggregate my accounts for yearly balance sheets.

parkslope
parkslope
8 months ago
Reply to  Rick Connor

I prefer Zelle because it uses bank to bank transactions and is embedded in my bank’s app. However, I recently started using Venmo after finding out that it can be linked with my Amex card without a fee which means that I don’t have to give Venmo my bank account info.

OUTinMinnesota
OUTinMinnesota
1 year ago

When young, my dad’s example was what I followed… use a spreadsheet to track spending and to plan for upcoming bills.

When I started investing, I got damned frustrated because that spreadsheet couldn’t update itself as market values updated. That frustration led me to the Quicken app.

I’m still using it for three basic functions:

  • Cashflow management
  • Budget management
  • Investment management
Mike Zaccardi
Mike Zaccardi
1 year ago

I use good ole excel for most personal finance tracking. Boring, I concede.

There are some cool sites though – obliviousinvestor has a great Social Security calculator, BofA/Merrill has awesome free research & charts, Fidelity Investments has a simple Solo 401k calculator, The Points Guy is ideal for credit card rewards, The Finance Buff has excellent takes on tax & retirement account issues.

I’m not big on the finance app scene – many times those can be information overload! Keeping it simple has its virtues.

Bob Drake
Bob Drake
3 months ago
Reply to  Mike Zaccardi

Me too Mike. Since I build my own spreadsheets I know what goes into the assumptions and I can play my own “what if” scenarios. You don’t know what’s behind the math in most published tools. I cringe when I see that they use the infallible “montecarlo simulation” – what did they use for the possibilities? As I’m comfortable with math I can build my own model and play with the assumptions myself.
Stuff like net worth tracking will in the long run be easier also as you can avoid mandatory inputs that don’t apply to your circumstances.
Most cannot do that I concede, but if you do have the ability, do your own math. It gives me a better comfort level than using unknown assumptions I can’t see.

Adam Grossman
Adam Grossman
1 year ago

Tiller Money is a relatively new tool for tracking expenses. It downloads data into a Google Sheet. It’s not nearly as polished as something like Mint, but in exchange for the rough edges, it’s very flexible.

James McGlynn CFA RICP®
James McGlynn CFA RICP®
1 year ago

I use “Personal Capital” as my financial aggregator. It keeps track of my expenses, investment accounts and mortgage. It also has a very good retirement feature projecting my pensions, annuities, medical expenses projected investment returns. The service is free-although I’m sure they prefer you to use their investment products.

kristinehayes2014
kristinehayes2014
1 year ago

I have been using “Mint” for about two years now. It’s a simple way to keep track of my various accounts and their balances.

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