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Luxury Liner Living

Marjorie Kondrack

MOST OF US REACH a point in retirement where we think about downsizing. This happened most recently for us when my husband was replacing batteries in our smoke alarms. This required him to stand on a ladder and look up, triggering a bout of vertigo.

This and other elder episodes, happening as we try to perform simple, everyday tasks, caused us to rethink our ability to remain in our current home. We’re not decrepit yet, but we are slowly succumbing to the vagaries of aging.

Many retirees choose to move to 55-plus communities. For those a little further down the road, there are assisted-living facilities and continuing care retirement communities. Today, we also have the choice of 55-plus “resort living” communities, described by the owners as “upscale.” Translation: expensive. These are independent living apartments where you pay rent on a month-to-month lease. There’s no buy-in or one-time fee.

These communities are portrayed as “cruise-ship-style living.” The amenities include executive chefs providing three meals a day, an array of snacks, salads and sandwiches for in-between noshers, room service, free wi-fi and utilities, weekly housekeeping and concierge service. Pets are allowed, and there’s a host of additional services.

My interest in this style of living was piqued when construction began on a resort living community close to my home. A friend asked me to accompany her to an information seminar given by the management. I also wanted to learn more about this Utopian-sounding existence. There’s no home upkeep, no cooking or shopping for food, no worrying about home repairs, lawn care, snow removal and so on.

The salesman giving the presentation was top-notch, with a resonant, booming voice that even those with diminished hearing couldn’t fault. It all sounded like Nirvana, but being a “kick the tires” kind of person, I’ve decided to reserve judgment until I can have a look-see after construction is completed. The company has approximately 50 communities throughout the country, but none is close enough for me to visit for an inspection.

The fee for a two-bedroom apartment is $6,500 a month for one person and an additional $1,000 for a second occupant, putting the price tag at $7,500 for a couple. Studio and one-bedroom apartments are less. This monthly fee is subject to an increase of 3% to 5% annually, depending on location and other factors. Not surprisingly, such communities are all located in affluent areas.

Construction for our local community is expected to be completed by year’s end. My friend decided to make a $500 deposit. The deposit can be applied to the first month’s rent and is returnable at any time, no questions asked, or so they say. This is called becoming a “charter member” and comes with various privileges.

I’ve decided to delay any decision until I can check everything out, including the food. The brochure pictured a tasty-looking prime rib dinner. But if they run out, I don’t want to be eating fried baloney sandwiches. Stay tuned.

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Boomerst3
Boomerst3
1 day ago

Seems like a lot of money to get food service. What about choosing a nice place with reasonable prices and hire a person to cook meals, or a mail order food service that delivers? Rent increases of 3-5% a year will add up over time. If you have a ton of money, go for it. Otherwise, I bet there are better alternatives out there. Move to a condo and you have no home repairs or upkeep as well. The only benefit here is the unlimited food, so if you do not eat constantly a lot, you’re out of luck. Also, Wi-Fi and utilities are not free. They come out of the $90,000 you pay a year for a 2 bedroom unit.

Last edited 1 day ago by Boomerst3
Marjorie Kondrack
Marjorie Kondrack
1 day ago
Reply to  Boomerst3

You made a lot of valid points. And your practical approach makes a lot of sense. Many older people, however, live alone and like the idea of a more secure environment, and the possibility of meeting new people and participating in the planned recreational activities may also be of interest.

I was somewhat curious about this RSL and thought the information might be of interest to HD readers. It’s not an endorsement of this style of living.

Your viewpoint is well taken. Thank you for your input.

Chazooo
Chazooo
1 day ago

Thanks for this article – it opens up yet another choice for those of us who have the opportunity to enjoy a pampered First World lifestyle. First I’ve heard of “resort style” retirement in a physical development but seems only natural that the purveyors of upscale lifestyles would pursue such a course.

Marjorie Kondrack
Marjorie Kondrack
1 day ago
Reply to  Chazooo

You’re welcome, Chazoo. Good to know what’s out there and pampering is a good thing.

Ginger Williams
Ginger Williams
2 days ago

I’m not retired yet, but have started looking at retirement communities. The better ones that are within my budget all have 3-5 year waitlists. I’m seriously considering paying an associate membership fee, which puts me on the waitlist and gives me access to some of the activities. The fee would be applied to buy in cost if and when I move in.

Marjorie Kondrack
Marjorie Kondrack
1 day ago

correction…blog referred to below is on mylifesite.com—not my lifestyle.com.

Marjorie Kondrack
Marjorie Kondrack
1 day ago

Oops…mylifesite.net.

Marjorie Kondrack
Marjorie Kondrack
1 day ago

Ginger…there is an excellent blog on my lifestyle.net about how retirement community waiting lists work and will give you a more secure footing. Name of blog is When to Get On the Wait List at a Retirement Community.
Good Luck.

Michael1
Michael1
1 day ago

Marjorie, thanks for the resource (and the article). I just looked and it’s actually at mylifesite.net (not lifestyle).

Marjorie Kondrack
Marjorie Kondrack
1 day ago
Reply to  Michael1

Michael..thanks for the correction. You have a sharp eye. I thought the article on mylifesite was spot on.

AmeliaRose
AmeliaRose
2 days ago

Thank you for giving me a new search term – “resort living communities.” These places sound good but I fear I’m too introverted to be comfortable there.

Marjorie Kondrack
Marjorie Kondrack
2 days ago
Reply to  AmeliaRose

AmeliaRose…There are so many choices for retirement lifestyles. I know you’ll find one best suited to your level of comfort.
Thanks for your comments and have fun searching.

mytimetotravel
mytimetotravel
2 days ago

[Full disclosure – I wrote the CCRC article linked at the beginning of this one.]

That monthly fee for one person is about 50% more than the monthly fee at the CCRC I expect to enter in the fall, but with no entry fee, in a HCOL area, it probably needs to be. The annual increase is also a bit higher than the historical rise at my CCRC, but it went up 7% this year because of inflation and the need to pay higher wages to keep staff.

What kind of medical care, if any, is available on site? If you need some assistance, short of Assisted Living, do you have to find and pay for the help yourself? What happens when you can no longer live independently?

I assume that if you run out of money you have to leave? My non-profit CCRC promises to keep me, and has a benevolent fund to back up the promise.

I am very wary of for-profit enterprises in this space. Their interests are not aligned with yours. Also, even if this company has squeaky-clean financials, and a good bond rating, there is no guarantee it won’t be taken over by some less well-run company.

BTW, there are people living year round on cruise ships. I recently saw a report on one that will cost $30,000/year for a three year cruise: https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/3-year-cruise-mv-gemini/index.html

Last edited 2 days ago by mytimetotravel
Marjorie Kondrack
Marjorie Kondrack
2 days ago
Reply to  mytimetotravel

timetotravel..I really admire your thoroughness and savvy approach to everything.
They do have on onsite pharmacy and some medical assistance you have access to through an agency they partner with and it is on site too. The annual increases concerned me as well.
So many things to consider.
Have not delved into all their policies as yet but my sense tells me your assumptions are correct, as far as running out of money is concerned.

You are right to be circumspect. Your CCRC may be your best choice.

Thanks for your thoughtful and cogent comments.

mytimetotravel
mytimetotravel
2 days ago

Thanks, Marjorie! I’ll be interested to read your thoughts on this going forward. It’s such a consequential decision.

Andrew Forsythe
Andrew Forsythe
2 days ago

Marjorie, thanks for this. We hope to remain in our home of 35 years but it’s good to know what options are out there “just in case”. I look forward to your updates on this one.

Marjorie Kondrack
Marjorie Kondrack
2 days ago

I can relate very strongly, Andrew. We’ve been in our home more than 36 years. Outsource a lot of chores we used to handle ourselves and grateful we can but it’s problematic at times. Thanks for your comments.

Mike Gaynes
Mike Gaynes
2 days ago

If “cruise-ship-style living” is the objective and your health is good, it seems like it would be considerably less expensive to just live on cruise ships! All the same services and the scenery changes every day.

Marjorie Kondrack
Marjorie Kondrack
2 days ago
Reply to  Mike Gaynes

Mike – could be something to look into, I have heard of that lifestyle as well.
Some people, however, like staying in the area. My friend who signed up liked the idea of being near her family – and some of us have weak sea legs. Thanks for your comment.

R Quinn
R Quinn
2 days ago

Where are such places?

Marjorie Kondrack
Marjorie Kondrack
2 days ago
Reply to  R Quinn

Dick…if you google Resort Living Communities you’ll find all the locations throughout the country. This new one is in Moorestown, NJ. Still under construction. Nothing else in our area. As far as I can see the nearest one to Moorestown is in the Syracuse, NY area.
Several in Florida and surrounding states.

parkslope
parkslope
2 days ago

Waterstone of Westchester (White Plains, NY), which opened last year, is a bit closer to Moorestown. Rent for a two-bedroom is $11,000 with an additional $2,500 for a second person.

Marjorie Kondrack
Marjorie Kondrack
2 days ago
Reply to  parkslope

Thanks for the information. Although Whitestone ad includes on site restaurant I dont think the cost of meals is included.

Marjorie Kondrack
Marjorie Kondrack
2 days ago

Included in rent, that is.

parkslope
parkslope
2 days ago

The rent includes a continental breakfast and dinner.

We are moving to Broadview Senior Living in Purchase, NY when it opens in the fall and will be renting an interim apartment in the Waterstone from May-Oct.

Marjorie Kondrack
Marjorie Kondrack
2 days ago
Reply to  parkslope

Sounds very exciting. Wish you much happiness and thanks for the additional information.

parkslope
parkslope
1 day ago

Thanks. Unfortunately, we are moving to a CCRC sooner than we had planned due to my wife’s health issues. However, we feel very fortunate that we can afford to move to an upscale facility that is located on the campus of a college that offers many cultural opportunities.

Marjorie Kondrack
Marjorie Kondrack
15 hours ago
Reply to  parkslope

I’m so sorry about your wife’s health issue but glad you will be moving to a nice facility where life will be easier for both of you. Hope you both will enjoy many happy years in your new home.

R Quinn
R Quinn
2 days ago

That’s a hefty price tag, but when you add in all the goodies, maybe not. A two bedroom – small – apartment a half mile from me goes for $5,000 with no benefits other than a community pool.

Actually, if the promise is fulfilled it may be a bargain. I assume the apartment has a full kitchen – just in case.

Marjorie Kondrack
Marjorie Kondrack
2 days ago
Reply to  R Quinn

Dick – full kitchen, yes. Also valet services and on site Manager. They even give you an alert necklace type device to wear for emergencies. Didn’t want to sound like an advertisement so I didn’t include all the amenities. Think we’ll be neighbors one day?

R Quinn
R Quinn
2 days ago

I checked out all i could find on their website. I don’t think it’s for us. Seems too organized for me. Apartments are pretty small, but i certainly can see the attraction for many people.

Marjorie Kondrack
Marjorie Kondrack
2 days ago
Reply to  R Quinn

i can appreciate your point about size of living quarters. We’d really miss our roomy comfortable home but not the stairs and all the upkeep. Should have started this process 10 years ago. I have faith it will all work out.
Thanks, Dick. Always look forward to your comments.

R Quinn
R Quinn
2 days ago

Stairs were a problem for my wife so we chose a 55+ condo community. Our unit is 2,000 sf and we have pool, clubhouse, activities if we want them, tennis courts, putting green – but alas nobody to cook for us – that’s me😎

Marjorie Kondrack
Marjorie Kondrack
2 days ago
Reply to  R Quinn

I heard you cooked a nice corned beef dinner. Happy St. Patrick’s Day.☘️

Edmund Marsh
Edmund Marsh
2 days ago

Marjorie, I’m 61 and still changing batteries for our mothers. But, I’ve recently been thinking about the time when I should keep my feet on the ground at all times. I’m tuned in.

Marjorie Kondrack
Marjorie Kondrack
2 days ago
Reply to  Edmund Marsh

Yes, Ed. So many places have waiting lists. Wise to keep your eyes open. Good luck when the time comes for your decision.

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