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What should investors do about the possibility of higher interest rates?

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Richard Gore
Richard Gore
2 days ago

I don’t think you should do anything. I can’t predict future interest rates so I don’t try.

Carl Book
Carl Book
3 days ago

Stay the heck away from long term bonds. They will get killed if rates rise.

Rick Connor
Rick Connor
3 days ago

Not much, and I’m a little worried that I should be doing more. Most of my bonds are in a Vanguard Total Bond funds, and I’m thinking of shortening that holding. I’m still not at the point where I need to touch retirement savings, but that is getting closer.

Marc Bisbal Arias
Marc Bisbal Arias
6 days ago

There are several things investors can do about potential higher rates. One would be to ignore the issue altogether. I’ve seen people argue that higher rates is what bondholders should hope for, because they’ll receive higher interest payments. But it could be a costly proposition if the fall in bonds’ prices are larger than the benefits from higher rates. This is the option I’d be most wary of.

Another option would be to invest in bonds with short maturities. These bonds would be less affected to increases in rates. However, they will offer lower returns too.

Bonds with higher coupons are also less affected by higher rates. But they can have other risks, such as a higher probability of default.

Investors might just not hold any bonds. While this erases the risk of rising rates completely, it also comes at the expense of earning minimal (if any) returns in a bank account or similar products.

Finally, one could switch from investing in bond funds to individual bonds. If an investor plans to hold the bond until maturity, the price of the bond will not fall because they won’t sell it. Bond funds are marked-to-market daily so if rates go up, the price of the fund will go down. Nonetheless, buying a bond directly, rather than indirectly through a fund, has disadvantages. First, it can be more costly and complicated. Second, owning a handful of bonds offers less diversification benefits than a bond fund. And last, but not least, the nominal value of the individual bonds will be worth less if rates and inflation are higher.

There are pros and cons for each of these scenarios. There could be other options. The takeaway is that we must make the trade-off that we’re comfortable with, which can in turn depend on our risk tolerance, expectations, and preferences.

EDIT:

As Joseph told me on Twitter, I didn’t mean to say individual bonds aren’t marked-to-market. I meant to say that by investing in an individual bond, if held to maturity, there will be no loss of principal. But bond fund managers can trade and realize losses.

Last edited 6 days ago by Marc Bisbal Arias
Sanjib Saha
Sanjib Saha
4 days ago

For holding until maturity, one doesn’t need to own individual bonds. There are target-maturity bond funds to serve the same purpose (e.g., Invesco Bulletshare ETFs, iBonds, even some closed-end funds). These invest in multiple bonds that mature around the same “bullet” date.

Last edited 4 days ago by Sanjib Saha
Marc Bisbal Arias
Marc Bisbal Arias
1 day ago
Reply to  Sanjib Saha

Interesting, I wasn’t aware. Thank you for sharing.

Sanjib Saha
Sanjib Saha
7 days ago

I’m simply limiting my bond investments to shorter term and high quality. I have no idea when rates will go up, but the current rates are not worth taking any maturity or credit quality risks. I’m also trimming stock exposure as the market keeps on hitting new highs. I love mechanical rebalancing – takes emotion out of the picture.

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