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What are your top financial worries?

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Jackie
Jackie
11 months ago

As we grow older, we become much more susceptible to falling under the influence of someone who does not share our desire to bequeath our estate to our kids.

I have seen several cases of new spouses and “trusted” relatives essentially stealing inheritances because someone was able to manipulate the surviving spouse.

Last edited 5 months ago by Jackie
Kyle Mcintosh
Kyle Mcintosh
11 months ago

I worry about identify theft. We’ve had our credit cards knocked-off three times in the last two years. Each time, the fraud has been low dollar and we’ve not incurred any cost ourselves. That said, as fraudsters get more sophisticated, I worry they can get at our assets and potentially cause serious financial damage.

Jim Wood
Jim Wood
1 year ago

My son’s financial future. He is living paycheck to paycheck due to a divorce, child support and a general lack of understanding of real world finances.

Last edited 1 year ago by Jim Wood
Edwin Belen
Edwin Belen
1 year ago

LTC. This has taken too much thinking and analysis from me. I’m only 51 but want to set things so I don’t have to worry about them later. I guess I’m lucky that this is one of the last things to sort through before calling it quits from a career standpoint.

Chris Wieser
Chris Wieser
8 months ago
Reply to  Edwin Belen

Re: LTC….Assuming you’re healthy, have you looked into a life insurance policy with a LTC rider (I’m sure there’s a name for this product but I don’t know what it is). Essentially works like this: You buy a life insurance policy, let’s say death benefit is $250,000. If you need LTC, instead of your beneficiaries getting the $250K when you die, you can draw on the $250K death benefit to pay for LTC expenses. If you have an existing whole life policy, you can do a 1035 exchange to pay for some or all of the new policy.

Mike Zaccardi
Mike Zaccardi
1 year ago

Having left the corporate 9-5 world a few months ago, this area is on my mind. I worry about my new profession being so tightly correlated with how the stock market performs. If the market tanks, my portfolio drops and I will likely lose consulting work. That’s one thing.

Another is health care. A significant issue can obviously hurt one’s financial situation, but even a lot of small things each year can run-up medical costs to the deductible in an HDHP and result in a material annual health care expense.

I’m also worried I’ll find the special gal who will cause my annual expenses to double. A little tongue-in-cheek here, but it’s something I must plan for. Let alone the possibility of having mouths to feed later in life.

Finally, I worry about my parents. My mother is 70 and pops is 65. Both are in so-so health at best and already struggle with stairs. There’s no plan among my family about who will take care of them, which I think is coming sooner or later. That too has a financial impact.

Lots to consider.

R Quinn
R Quinn
1 year ago
Reply to  Mike Zaccardi

If that gal is special, what your annual expenses will be will not even cross your mind, see what a couple of kids do to those expenses. FI has a new meaning 🤑

Ben Rodriguez
Ben Rodriguez
1 year ago

I’m worried that global growth will continue to be tepid or may be even slower than it has been in the past few decade (2%+/-), which will negatively impact stock performance, and thusly inhibit my ability to retire.

Adam Grossman
Adam Grossman
1 year ago

The cost of college, followed by the cost of college and the cost of college. It’s endlessly frustrating that college generally delivers a positive ROI, so it’s not an option to not want to send my children to college. But colleges have pushed the cost relentlessly higher, making that ROI harder and harder to justify.

Chris Wieser
Chris Wieser
8 months ago
Reply to  Adam Grossman

Here’s what I discovered about college expenses with my 3 children: if you have some flexibility, you can find a college that will heavily (or completely) subsidize the cost of college, including room & board. The catch: You need to figure out what attribute your son/daughter has that will make the college to cough up all that money. One example: I was talking to the admissions director trying to decide if my oldest should apply to the 2 or 4 year mechanical engineering program (he wasn’t the most studious guy in high school). During this discussion I mentioned that I noticed they did not have any students from NY (there was a graphic in their brochure that showed the breakdown by state). I could feel him sit up in his chair (over the phone). The conversation immediately changed: Now, he asked if my son was set on mechanical engineering because they had petroleum engineering scholarships that went unclaimed, and the 2 engineering programs were identical for the 1st 2 years. I have other similar stories that greatly reduced the total cost of college.

Kyle Mcintosh
Kyle Mcintosh
11 months ago
Reply to  Adam Grossman

I’m planning a few articles coming on the cost of college, financial aid, and an analysis of whether or not a 529 is a good savings tool. I have a high school freshman and a middle schooler and it’s amazing how much uncertainty there is regarding how much we will pay for this highly likely near-term expenditure.

David Powell
David Powell
1 year ago
Reply to  Adam Grossman

For many kids, a sensible path is to send them to a community college to complete general education credits there while getting an associates degree, before paying for a bachelor’s from a four-year school. The credits usually transfer easily. And if it happens that your son or daughter isn’t yet mature enough or academically ready for college, the tuition for learning THAT lesson will be far cheaper.

Catherine
Catherine
1 year ago
Reply to  Adam Grossman

Might I recommend the book “The Price You Pay For College” by Ron Lieber? Despite my own experience and expertise in higher education, I found this book fascinating and useful.

William Ehart
William Ehart
1 year ago

I’m very worried about what seems to be an excess of speculation in financial markets. We’ve already seen one hedge fund blow up, badly hurting a couple of banks because of the huge leverage involved. Then we have retail investors buying stocks touted on message boards, red-hot fund managers becoming celebrities. We have a market pricing in a great future, and returns over the next 10 years, until my retirement, may be much lower. And I’m worried about potential conflict between the major powers, perhaps over Taiwan. If you think semiconductors are in short supply now, just wait until the island is under attack. I am slightly trimming my stock positions.

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