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How did you get started as an investor?

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Mike Ester
Mike Ester
1 month ago

We inherited my late in-laws’ Edward Jones account in 2009. Neither of us had any investing experience, so we just went along with the “financial advisor”. We thought nothing of following his recommendation to switch to an ‘Assets Under Management” model. We had a nagging feeling about the monthly fees, but we didn’t follow up on those feelings.

The pandemic provided me an opportunity to think about our finances. I discovered the Bogleheads’ wiki and forum, and learned about lowering the costs of investment. After reading Allen Roth’s, “How A Second-Grader Beats Wall Street”, we decided to take the plunge into DIY investing. We moved our EJ assets to self-directed accounts with Vanguard, and are already reaping the benefits of keeping more of our money.

We decided on an asset allocation that takes my vested retirement benefits into account. Our rebalancing triggers are based on 5% bands, which keeps us from buying high and selling low. We are much happier now.

Jeff
Jeff
1 month ago

I watched Financial News Network from the time it was first launched until it became CNBC. When my work offered a 401k , I invested regularly. I continue to educate myself about investing through books and CNBC even today. I used to read Mr Clements articles in the newspaper. I sure miss those.

Carl Book
Carl Book
1 month ago

I transitioned from a savings account to CD’s, and then to money market funds at T Rowe Price. I soon became intrigued with no load mutual funds and invested small amounts in a couple of stock funds. I read personal finance articles in “Money” and “Forbes” magazines and watched “Wall Street Week” with Lou Rukeyser.

K Lacey
K Lacey
1 month ago

My dad always owned a few stocks that never went anywhere, but they were fun to look at back when newspapers published daily stock market prices in eights. This kept a ten year old busy. In high school dad transferred a few stocks to me that never went up in price. After college and some years of working I sold those two stocks just before they took off in price. Working thru local brokers was so expensive the average Joe could not trade, but only own for a long time. Like watching grass grow,
.
Then came the internet, cheap commissions and the common man was on an even footing with the Big Boys. After some years of pain and scars, I got serious about learning to trade, and discovered OPTIONS. Now I sit at home and generate as much money as I need to pay the bills. There is so much money floating around in the USA and the world, I find it easy to tap in and have some of it stick to my fingers. I try to never get greedy, just earn what I need and be grateful. What a country !!!

Arpe Gio
Arpe Gio
3 months ago

Savings and not be profligate. The first investment was in a decent home, followed by investing in my family’s education.

Philip Stein
Philip Stein
4 months ago

I was about 28 and working in the aerospace industry when my company began layoffs in the wake of the Berlin Wall falling and the Soviet Union imploding.

I sat near an older fellow who received a pink slip and was concerned about his job loss. “Who’s going to hire a 55-year-old?” I heard him say.

It was then that I realized I had better start investing for the future so my life wouldn’t fall apart if I faced a job loss in my later years. I’ve been an ardent saver and investor ever since.

Roboticus Aquarius
Roboticus Aquarius
5 months ago

My brother and sister and I pooled our meager savings back in 1980, when we were all between 10 and 14, and bought some silver – because we couldn’t afford gold. The near immediate losses taught us something about speculation!

Last edited 5 months ago by Roboticus Aquarius
Mike Zaccardi
Mike Zaccardi
6 months ago

Age 18. Vanguard Roth IRA Target Retirement 2045 fund.

I had listened to Clark Howard on the radio during high school and enjoyed all the tips–particularly on how to achieve long-term wealth. I guess my dream was to have enough money to do what I want when I wanted.

I saved up cash from working at a local muni golf course and at Publix. I finally did it. I had $3,000 which was the investment minimum at the time. I set up an ACH, and off it went. I lost $15 my first day but was excited that I was now an investor for my own retirement.

I actually had an experience before that. I bought a 2.15% CD from Compass Bank when I was 17. I thought, “wow that’s better than 1.5% at an online bank!” Sweet deal. Then I learned more about how to really build wealth over time.

I’ve made it a goal to max out my retirement accounts each year, and have done it since 2005. Roth IRA, 401k, HSA, etc. I’m now financially independent and run my own little investment writing business and teach at the University of North Florida to easily cover my annual expenses while still having benefits.

Will I re-enter the 9-5 world? Perhaps. If the right role comes about. A place like Morningstar in Chicago or Creative Planning in Kansas could make sense.

Last edited 6 months ago by Mike Zaccardi
Thomas
Thomas
7 months ago

When I got my first job after college, I had a (very modest) disposable income for the first time in my life. I’m naturally frugal, so I began accumulating more money than I needed to cover day-to-day expenses. I had received little to no financial education from my schooling or my parents, so it was up to me to figure out what to do with my savings. After a bit of Googling, I found the Mr. Money Moustache blog, and that set me on a journey of financial self-education that I’ve continued to this day. It’s a little bit sad, but I learned far more about personal finance from blogs, forums, and Youtube channels (and HumbleDollar!) than I ever did at school.

Because I’m someone who’s prone to analysis paralysis, I started investing with the robo-advisor Betterment. A few years later, I took the time to learn the basics of investing and transitioned to a Bogleheads-approved two-fund portfolio.

Sonja Haggert
Sonja Haggert
7 months ago

My husband and I got started investing thanks to my in-laws. We had some fascinating discussions around the dinner table. Forever grateful to them for the wisdom they imparted. Yes, my mother-in-law was involved!

Rick Connor
Rick Connor
7 months ago

My older brother was an investor and he convinced a bunch of us to start an investment club. That got me interested and I started reading and researching. That led to my more general interest in personal financial planning. An investment club is a great way to combine learning with friendship.

SCao
SCao
7 months ago

Only about three years ago when I was knowning little about investing and picked one stock and invested a large sum on it. The stock went through roller coaster ride (down more than 50%), which I was lucky as no need to sell until earlier this year when it was fully recovered (and a bit more). During this “journey”, I realized I need to learn more about investing and personall finance overall, because picking stock will get me burn (badly) and I am more interested in long term investment vs. short term.

Bob Wilmes
Bob Wilmes
7 months ago

In 1981 IBM introduced the personal computer which I thought would be a huge hit. I bought 100 shares of Verbatim which made the relatively cheap, disposable 5 and 1/4 inch floppy disks for about $10 a share. Later I sold the share for my first profit (about $14/share), paid the taxes and hefty stock commission and learned immediately that you had to invest for 12 months to get the long term capital gains tax. A lesson that I learned early and has kept with me ever since. Coincidentally a giant bull market started in 1982 at about 820 on the DJIA.

Verbatim was later bought out for around $5 a share by Kodak as the technology became commoditized.

Tom Hyland
Tom Hyland
7 months ago

When I was 9 years old, A friend was given a mutual fund by his father.
He was allowed to spend his dividend check as he pleased.
We went to the candy store with the $4 dividend. Again, next quarter. 🙂
Third quarter, He told me “No more money”.
He was letting the money grow in the fund. No more candy. 🙁
Followed Wall Street after that. 11 years later, I started.
I wanted my own checks in the mail.

Last edited 7 months ago by Tom Hyland
R Quinn
R Quinn
7 months ago

When I started working at 18 there was a brokerage office across the street and on breaks and lunchI went over and sat and watched the ticker go by. Made friends with one of the brokers who gave me “tips” on penny stock. Thankfully we were dealing in a hundred dollars or so, at least before I lost it all.

Ben Rodriguez
Ben Rodriguez
7 months ago

I contributed to my 401k at my first job as a lawyer when I was 26. I didn’t learn what a Roth IRA was for a few more years.

John Goodell
John Goodell
7 months ago

I started investing in gold mining companies in college because I could see that Gordon Brown had sold all England’s gold and thereby created a massive buying opportunity. I made a lot of money riding a 10 year bull market in the precious metal, and then I rode that market right back down. Once I realized that gold companies were capital intensive lottery tickets that depended on external factors like the price of gold and the politics of the country they mined in, I began searching for alternatives, and eventually discovered index funds. When I think of the opportunity cost for this long delay, it makes me sick.

Last edited 7 months ago by John Goodell
Ben Rodriguez
Ben Rodriguez
7 months ago
Reply to  John Goodell

Wow, great timing!

Andrew F.
Andrew F.
7 months ago

I was motivated to become more DIY after some less than stellar experiences with full service brokers back in the bad old days. Then when folks like Jack Bogle and Charles Schwab started making it easier for individual investors to handle their own finances, I got interested. And then when the internet came along and made it all so much easier and faster, I was fully onboard.

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